The Holocaust... A Survivor's Tale...

never again...

Eva's Books

The Promise: A Moving Story of a Family in the Holocaust.’  London: Penguin Books, 2006.

Commentary by Barbara Powers, co-author with Eva Schloss

‘Imagine writing a book with one of your best friends, spending hours talking about all that has happened in your life, the good times and the bad, cherished memories and memories you wish you could forget, your dreams and stories. This is how The Promise came about. It started with a friendship.

I first met Eva after suffering a personal tragedy. I listened in awe as she told about her experiences during the Holocaust, the horrendous events that erased whole families from the face of the earth, devastated a continent and overturned the world. I was amazed at how Eva’s family endured and how she and her mother survived. I was also deeply inspired by her parents, who found reasons to be happy in the midst of uncertainty and focused on hope when surrounded by despair; and by her only brother, Heinz, who brought beauty into sadness with his poetry, music, storytelling and painting.

‘Survivors aren’t heroes,’ Eva tells others. She feels very fortunate to have had a full life.  She is thankful for her children and grandchildren, her husband of more than fifty years, her countless friends, the miracle of birth, the beauty of creation, flowers in the spring and each new day. Eva’s energy for meeting new people, exploring new places and facing new challenges seems limitless.  She even went parasailing at the age of seventy!

Eva has transformed a magnitude of personal sadness and suffering into a gift of compassion and a mission for peace. She has chosen not to harbor anger or bitterness, but shares her family’s story in order to help others understand the results of intolerance, hatred and injustice, as well as the fruits of love and acceptance. She joins men, women and children of all ages and backgrounds who long for a better world

 

‘Eva’s Story.’  by Evelyn-Julia Kent and Eva Schloss

 

Eva was 15 years old when she was sent to Auschwitz - the same age as her friend Anne Frank. Together with her mother she endured the daily degradation that robbed the world of so many precious people - including her father and brother. 

 

Eva and Mutti were asleep in the hospital block, weak, emaciated and close to death when the Nazis evacuated the camp in January 1945.  Somehow they survived and eventually found their way to freedom.  Their journey required immense courage, hope, compassion, determination, patience, endurance, kindness and luck! 

 

Eva’s Story is a compelling tale of a mother and daughter whose lives were saved by miracles and chance two women whose desire for justice, tolerance and peace became a mission to make the world a better place.  

 

Reviews of ‘Eva’s Story’


‘High on the list of Holocaust reading.’ (Jewish Telegraph)

 

‘Could even become a companion volume to the famous [Anne Frank] diary.’ (Derby Evening Telegraph)

 

‘A patently honest account of the struggle of a courageous and resourceful young woman to survive in a nightmare world’ (Jewish Chronicle)


Links:

The Promise - http://www.us.penguingroup.com/nf/Book/BookDisplay/0,,9780141320816,00.html?/The_Promise_Eva_Schloss

Reviews of The Promise

“Really good book, worth reading and page-turning indeed!”

“A good companion book for The Diary of Anne Frank (the author's mother, also widowed by the Holocaust, married Otto Frank) but geared towards young adults.”

“A remarkable personal testimony, recounted in a gentle way, free of any vengeance feelings.”

“The author tells the story with love and hope throughout.”

One of the things that the reader can take from the book is to gain an awareness of gratitude, especially with our modern day comforts and lifestyles. Another is living in peace; a thing that many peoples and countries in the West largely take for granted. Ignoring these things does not bring us happiness.”

Reviews of Eva’s Story

“Highly recommended for teachers and students of literature of the Holocaust!”

“I didn't set it down until I was reading the epilogue.”